CORDOBA, SPAIN

7/2/2013 3:02 PM

The olive tree, derived from the domestication of wild olive, is the main oleaginous crop of the Mediterranean Basin. Spain is the world leading country for olive production, with more than 2.4 million ha, of which 63% are located in Andalusia (southern Spain). Olive cropping systems include agroforestry stands (in marginal soils and hills), traditional groves and new intensive orchards. 

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Posted in WIW Europe By Mo Bio

Pavilion Lake, in northern British Columbia, holds a uniquely diverse array of microbialites that may offer information for equally diverse applications, spanning from the ancient past to vitality at the far reaches of our solar system! PhD Student Rick White, along with the Suttle Lab at the University of British Columbia, describes his research endeavors at this exciting site. 'The Pavilion Lake Research Project (PLRP) is an international, multi-disciplinary, science and exploration effort to explain the origin of freshwater microbialites in Pavilion Lake, British Columbia, Canada. Fossil microbialites represent some of the earliest remnants of life on ancient Earth, and were common from ~2.5 billion to 540 million years ago. Today, microbialites are found in environments where conditions are often too harsh for most organisms. However, the microbialites in Pavilion Lake have provided a new environment for the scientific community to study that demonstrates that large, and uniquely shaped structures can also occur in non-extreme environments that support fish, plants and other species.

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Posted in WIW North America By Mo Bio

BIO197L, Central Iowa

7/1/2013 3:28 PM

Led by Dr. Chinh Doa, undergraduates of Drake University are delving into a project to assess microbial ecosystems within the prairies and waterways of central Iowa through molecular fingerprinting. The major goals of this project are to measure the changes in microbial diversity over time in a given water or soil microenvironment, quantify the fluctuations, and determine how sensitive microbial communities are to ‘normal’ changes in their environment.  These students sampled the state parks and two rivers in the Des Moines area, the Des Moines River and the Raccoon River, as well as an area near the city dump. 

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Posted in WIW North America By Mo Bio

The infamous LA river winds through the center of Los Angeles, heavily polluted with waste from the city. It may not quality as a southern California scenic destination, but as far as bioremediation projects go, this locale is ideal! The river provides a fertile source of microorganisms accustomed to living with and degrading pollutants. Nikki Thadani and a team of fellow California Institute of Technology (Caltech) undergraduates have chosen this urban river as their site of choice for the iGEM synthetic biology competition. They hope to produce a bioremediation system for endocrine disruptors. Endocrine disruptors such as DDT and BPA have a significant detrimental impact on the reproductive systems of organisms living

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Posted in WIW North America By Mo Bio

"How many organisms live on a square centimeter of your skin? What do they do, and how do they differ from those of your neighbor? Each person’s microbial jungle is so rich, colorful, and dynamic that in all likelihood your body hosts species that no scientist has ever studied. Your navel may very well be one of the last biological frontiers. It is time to explore!" proposes Jiri Hulcr, PhD, of the Belly Button Biodiversity project. 

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Posted in WIW North America By Mo Bio

Ryan Adams, Greg Barnes, and Taylor Foulger, of Southern Utah University, in collaboration with mentors Terri Hildebrand and Paul Spruell, are wading their way into utilizing DNA analysis to describe irrigation water bacterial communities. They state, "access to clean water is essential to life.  Around the world, water is used for both drinking and agricultural purposes; therefore, pathogen free water is paramount to healthy living.  Methods that test for specific pathogenic bacteria in water samples have been developed.  However, these approaches are limited in scope and do not detect non-pathogenic or atypical bacteria.  Our research seeks to describe the bacterial communities of irrigation water found in Iron County, Utah using DNA sequencing analysis.  During the course of this research bacterial DNA has been isolated, using the UltraClean® Water DNA Isolation Kit, ...

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Posted in WIW North America By Mo Bio

Anchialine habitats are defined as coastal ponds and pools that lack surface connections to the open ocean, but are influenced by both seawater and freshwater sources via subterranean connections to the ocean and underlying freshwater aquifers. Habitats fitting this definition are found worldwide, but are concentrated in the Hawaiian Islands, with 600 of the world’s ~1000 habitats. These Hawaiian anchialine habitats host diverse and often endemic macro- and microbiotic communities. Unfortunately, anchialine habitats in Hawaii are threatened by habitat destruction and alteration due to coastal development and invasive species. 

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Posted in WIW North America By Mo Bio

The US viticulture industry generates >$30 billion revenue each year and employs more than 24,000 people. It is also a growth industry, but one that is highly susceptible to the vagaries of climate and changing weather patterns. There is exceptional merit in exploring the “quality” of soil and the vine microbiome when growing wine as there is a fundamental link between plant health and productivity and the microbial dynamics in the biogeochemical cycling nutrients.

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Posted in WIW North America By Mo Bio

Lee Ripma ( Graduate Student) : The objective of my master’s thesis research project is to elucidate the evolutionary relationships within the genus Oreocarya (Boraginaceae). Oreocarya has long been treated as a subgenus of Cryptantha and defined by perennial (or biennial) duration and production of only chasmogamous flowers. Past treatments by Payson and Higgins treated Oreocarya as a generic section or subgenus. A forethcoming paper by Hasenstab and Simpson recovers Oreocarya as a monophyletic clade and resurects the group to genus level. Their molecular phylogeny of Cryptantha s.l. finds that the genus as currently treated is polyphyletic and warrants a split into 5 genera. The group will be split into Cryptantha s.s., Oreocarya, Eremocarya, Greeneocharis and Johnstonella.

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Posted in WIW North America By Mo Bio

S

table Isotope Lab use MoBio products at the Toolik Field Station located in northern Alaska. They are investigating microbial communities in arctic tundra soils and how different metabolic pathways are utilized. 

Jessica examines shifts in soil microbial community structure, activity, and functionality as a result of increased soil temperature and moisture, increased thaw depth, and altered vegetation caused by excess winter snow accumulation in a permafrost tussock tundra ecosystem.  Mobio's products have been extremely helpful in the field where I am using Mobio's LifeGuard soil preservation solution to instantly stabilize soil microbial RNA and DNA on the spot, giving me plenty of time to finish field work without worrying about instantly freezing my samples. Thanks Mobio!! - Says Jessica.

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Posted in WIW North America By Mo Bio

LINNANMAA, FINLAND

7/1/2013 3:14 PM

Working with samples from rare and endangered bird species such as White-tailed Sea Eagles, Golden Eagles and Temminck’s stints, Dr. Laura Kvist and her colleagues at the University of Oulu, Linnanmaa consider each collected sample to be precious and switched to MO BIO products after experiencing PCR amplification problems.

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Posted in WIW Europe By Mo Bio

TRENTINO, ITALY

7/1/2013 3:12 PM

Nestled below the dramatic Dolomites, an expanse of vineyards cloaks the Trentino region of northern Italy. Nestled below these vineyards, lies an even more complex expanse of microbes. Claudia Longa, PhD at the IASMA Research and Innovation Center, Edmund Mach Foundation, along with colleagues of the plant-environment interaction program, has the most romantically-set research backdrop we have seen our kits experience. She and her team are studying the molecular profiling of microbial communities in soil and in the rhizosphere of vineyards from Trentino, ...

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Posted in WIW Europe By Mo Bio

SVALBARD, ARCTIC ARCHIPELAGO

7/1/2013 3:09 PM

In Ph. D. student Andy Canion's own words: "Greetings from the Arctic archipelago of Svalbard!  The lab of Dr. Joel Kostka, at Florida State University, recently participated in an international research expedition to study the microbes that live in the marine muds at the bottom of Arctic fjords.  The expedition was organized by the Max Planck Institute for Marine Microbiology in Bremen, Germany, and took place in the Svalbard archipelago (79°N), north of Norway.  Svalbard is a majestic place, with striking mountains, glaciers calving right into the water, and no shortage of polar bears.  There is also no shortage of researchers in the town of Ny-Ålesund, which has been converted from a coal-mining town to a year-round research station (the northernmost permanent residence in the world!).  

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Posted in WIW Europe By Mo Bio

Olive oil Factory, Morocco

7/1/2013 1:17 PM

Dr. Laurie Casalot, from the French Research Institute for Development (Marseilles, France), Department of Microbiology and Biotechnology of Hot Climates, extracts really complex samples from a settling tank at a semi-industrial olive oil factory in Morocco. The samples were collected at two different periods: 2 weeks after the oil-production campaign and 7 months after this campaign. In the meantime, the outside temperature reached more than 40ºC and the water evaporated leaving only an extremely viscous solution (see picture below), making the samples quite challenging for extracting DNA

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Posted in WIW Africa By Mo Bio

Antananarivo, Madagascar

7/1/2013 1:16 PM

Alexandre de Kochko from the “Centre IRD” in Montpellier (France) is working in collaboration
with two Malagasy Colleagues, Jean-Jacques Rakotomalala and Josiane Razafinarivo, (pictured above) on the evolution of Malagasy Coffea species. Coffea (coffee) is a large genus (containing more than 90 species) of flowering plants in the family Rubiaceae.

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Posted in WIW Africa By Mo Bio

Lake Magadi, Kenya

7/1/2013 1:13 PM

At the southernmost-tip of the East African Rift Valley in Kenya, lies a, at times, virtual pool of sodium carbonate, the Lake Magadi. This lake is replenished primarily by surrounding saline hot springs, setting the scene for an extremely challenging environment for life of any form. With soda covering around 80% of the lake surface in the dry season, and areas within the lake containing salt up to 40 meters thick, there is only one surviving species of fish withstanding the conditions.

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Posted in WIW Africa By Mo Bio

Namib Desert, Namibia

7/1/2013 1:13 PM

Thulani Makhalanyane, PhD candidate at the Institute for Microbial Biotechnology and Metagenomics, University of the Western Cape, South Africa, along with Professor Donald Cowan, recently took a trip to the Namib Desert, to conduct research focused on understanding the microbiology of hyperarid desert microbial communities, particularly, the hypolithic communities. Hypoliths, which are microbes found underneath translucent rocks, are particularly exciting microbial niche communities. "We are interested in understanding the composition and community dynamics of hypoliths. This involves the analysis of microbial (prokaryote and eukaryote) diversity, and building a relationship between community composition and local physiochemical properties such as pH, relative humidity and temperature. One of the microenvironmental dynamics which is particularly exciting is water relations - we would like to understand the relative contributions of rain, fog (condensation) and ground water."

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Posted in WIW Africa By Mo Bio

Gold Mines, South Africa

7/1/2013 1:09 PM

Princeton University Professor Tullis Onstott and his team used the MO BIO UltraClean® Mega Soil DNA Isolation Kit to remove bulk DNA from filtered fracture water for downstream metagenomic analyses. The water was collected from South African gold mines that stretch nearly a mile below the earth. A large scale DNA isolation kit was required for this project because of the enormous volume of water required for a complete metagenome – up to 8000 liters! While hot, salty water samples were collected from multiple boreholes, one specimen collected from a 2.8 km borehole yielded remarkable results. Using the16S rRNA gene to examine the biodiversity present in the fracture water, Tullis’ group discovered that 99.9% of the sample was comprised of a single bacteria. 

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Posted in WIW Africa By Mo Bio

Kevin Redd, PhD candidate, and colleages at the School of ZoologyMarine Research LaboratoriesTasmanian Aquaculture and Fisheries Institute (TAFI)-University of Tasmania use UltraClean® Fecal DNA Isolation Kit and UltraClean-htp® 96 Well Soil DNA Isolation Kit for their research.

The goals of the project are to examine the range of prey consumed by the southern rock lobster (Jasus edwardsii) and to further the understanding of the role that this predator has in the marine environment. In Australia, rock lobsters are the basis of important commercial and recreational fisheries and are sold live to discerning international markets. We have developed non-lethal techniques to collect fecal material from live rock lobsters so that our sampling efforts can be conducted in marine protected areas and in conjunction commercial fishing operations.

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Posted in WIW Oceania By Mo Bio

Auckland, New Zealand

7/1/2013 11:19 AM

The Hidden Secret of Soil: A team of scientists at ESR, Catriona Macdonald, Jacqui Horswell, Rachel Parkinson, Jill Vintiner, are using MO BIO’s PowerSoil® DNA Isolation Kit for soil to extract DNA from soils for forensic purposes.
In forensic science, soil is frequently encountered as trace evidence (e.g. on the sole of a shoe or the tread of a tire) but detailed soil analysis is seldom carried out in routine forensic examination for numerous reasons (e.g. cost, insufficient sample size, access to expertise).
ESR has been developing a technique to compare the microbial “fingerprint” of soils collected from realistic crime scenarios. The soil profiles are representative of the site of collection and therefore could potentially be used as associative evidence to prove a link between suspects and crime scenes.

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Posted in WIW Oceania By Mo Bio

Heybridge, Tasmania

7/1/2013 11:18 AM

Developing a biological reduction cell to remediate heavy metal and acid-containing industrial and mine leachates: Alison Dann is a Ph.D. candidate whose project is to study the environmental impact of an old industrial production plant in Tasmania. It was operated between 1948 and 1996 in Heybridge, located on the north coast of Tasmania on the Blythe River catchment. During the plant’s operation sulfuric acid/iron oxide waste was discharged directly into Bass Strait, resulting in elevated metal concentrations and a highly visible red plume along the coastline locally suppressing the marine benthic biota and altering biodiversity. The leachate is very similar to acid mine drainage

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Posted in WIW Oceania By Mo Bio

Guanabara Bay, Brazil

7/1/2013 11:07 AM

Dr. Leda Christina Mendonca-Hagler and her colleagues at the Rio de Janeiro Federal University characterize mangrove sediments in a highly-polluted region of the Guanabara Bay, Brazil. It is a challenge to identify the most efficient oil degrading bacteria in a polluted environment. They isolate DNA of soil-degrading bacteria from the rhizospheres of mangrove plants using our UltraClean® Soil DNA Isolation Kit.

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Posted in WIW Latin America By Mo Bio

Wild Birds, Venezuela

7/1/2013 11:06 AM

Dr. Maria A. García-Amado, Researcher from Laboratorio de Fisiología Gastrointestinal (Centro de Biofísica y Bioquímica, Instituto Venezolano de Investigaciones Científicas (IVIC), Mrs Sanz posdoctoral student from Centro de Ecologia (IVIC), both from Venezuela and Mrs Rodríguez-Ferraro, doctoral student from the Department of Biology, University of Missouri-St. Louis (USA) work in Venezuela in the detection of the Helicobacter genus in feces of wild birds. 

They isolate DNA of bacteria from the fecal samples using UltraClean® Microbial DNA Isolation Kit. Dr. Garcia-Amado quoted: “This kit is easy to use and we have excellent results!”The wild birds are caught with mist nets, Dr. Garcia-Amado and her colleagues took morphometric measurement and collected the feces, and then the birds are liberated.” (No harm is done to the birds during the process)

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Posted in WIW Latin America By Mo Bio

Milagro Fernández (see right picture) is currently a Ph.D. student in Biological Sciences at Simon Bolivar University, Venezuela. Her Ph.D. thesis subject is on detection and isolation of Vibrios in a marine coastal environment of Venezuela. She uses our UltraClean® Microbial DNA Isolation Kit for DNA extraction of Vibrio cultures from seawater, plankton, and oyster tissue.
The aim of her research is to detect and isolate pathogenic Vibrio spp. from seawater, plankton, and mollusks in a touristic area of Venezuela exposed to fecal contamination. These samples are analyzed by culture techniques, PCR and 16S rRNA gene sequencing. Milagro Fernandez quoted that "For total genomic DNA extraction from bacterial cultures, the UltraClean® Microbial DNA Isolation Kit has been very useful"
She is now using the UltraClean® Water DNA Isolation Kit for the direct detection of these bacteria in the environmental samples, whose presence is a public health concern.

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Posted in WIW Latin America By Mo Bio

Water up to 400°C shoots skyward carrying hoards of toxic chemicals from cracks in the earth's crust at the depths of our seas!  Aspects of the newly explored deep-sea hydrothermal vents are nothing short of absolutely captivating. Previous expeditions to these vents have identified strange and exotic sea floor dwellers, but the National Science Foundation's "Extreme 2008: A Deep-Sea Adventure" was the first to investigate the viral and protozoan extremophiles that play a vital role in vent ecosystem balance. Led by University of Delaware marine scientist, Craig Cary, this international research team set sail aboard the R/V Atlantis to the Pacific and Sea of Cortés, to explore this foreign and extreme environment.

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Posted in WIW Latin America By Mo Bio

Jennifer Kerekes is currently a Ph.D. student in the Department of Plant and Microbial Biology at the University of California, Berkeley. Her recent work at the Barro Colorado Nature Monument in Panama focused on the effect of repeated and long-term exposure of macronutrients and micronutrients on saprotrophic fungal diversity. She used the PowerSoil® DNA Isolation Kit  for total genomic DNA extraction from soil and leaf litter environmental samples. “The PowerSoil DNA Isolation Kit has been very useful for isolating total genomic DNA and has had great results in amplifying microbial DNA,” said Jennifer. She also had positive results with the PowerSoil DNA Isolation Kit in El Salvador at the Walter Thilo Deininger Park where, where in collaboration with the Instituto Salvadoreño de Turismo and the local community, she is studying the diversity and community structure of soil fungi in a dry tropical forest.

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Posted in WIW Latin America By Mo Bio

Deep, deep below the surface, at 2000m depth in the Gulf of California, lies an intriguing and unique hydrothermal vent system of microbial wonder. This system is unlike any other in that this hydrothermal fluid does not erupt through black smokers, but instead, slowly percolates upward through a layer of organic-rich thick sediment. A collaborative team of researchers from around the globe, including a group from UNC Chapel Hill led by chief scientist Andreas Teske, make up a multidisciplinary team, aboard the Guaymas Expedition- 2009, analyzing the geochemistry and microbiology of Guaymas hydrothermal seeps. These studies notably include analysis of the mats of Beggiatoa organisms that often form on top of active hot areas of fluid escape.

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Posted in WIW Latin America By Mo Bio

Lake Tai, China

7/1/2013 10:58 AM

Lake Tai (or as it is known to the local, Taihu) is the third largest lake in China - over 30 million people rely on it as a source of potable water and for various aquaculture, industrial and transportation purposes. Over the last few years though it has been inundated with massive algal bloom dominated by the potentially toxic cyanobacterium MicrocystisDr. Jennifer DeBruyn and Ms Sarah Farnsley accompanied Professor Steven Wilhelm, all from the University of Tennessee,  to Taihu in May 2009 to collect samples from the lake in order to begin to develop an understanding of the factors that control the proliferation of these toxic algae. 

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Posted in WIW Asia By Mo Bio

Nanjing, China

7/1/2013 10:56 AM

China's booming population, along with that of the rest of the world, demands an equally booming food and resources supply. In this light, Ning Ling, a Ph. D. student from the College of Resources and Environmental Sciences, Nanjing Agricultural University, China, is investigating a key aspect to our species survival. He is currently working on soil microbial ecology, researching the food crop nemesis, soil-borne watermelon pathogen, Fusarium oxysporum. In his studies, Ning Ling isolates DNA from diseased soil infested with Fusarium oxysporum (shown in the above photo, left side), and soil restored with various bio-organic fertilizers (above right). Using molecular biological methods, Ning Ling studies the differences in soil microflora between these soils to optimize crop stability.

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Posted in WIW Asia By Mo Bio

Thar Desert, Rajasthan, India

7/1/2013 10:54 AM

Subramanya Rao, PhD student at the University of Hong Kong, part of the Extremophiles Research Group run by Dr Steve Pointing, has taken an expedition to the Thar Desert to obtain samples from arid and semi arid regions within Rajasthan, India. The aim of this research is to examine the soil microbial community from arid and semi-arid regions of the desert and to understand ecosystem functioning in desert soil.

"Soil samples were collected in sterile tubes, one groups containing stabilization solution (used to extract RNA) and the other without (used to extract DNA). The soil samples were then transported to the laboratory for further analysis. Immediately cultivable microbes...

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Posted in WIW Asia By Mo Bio

Lake Hövsgöl, Mongolia

7/1/2013 10:53 AM

Every summer since 2008, a cadre of scientists from the University of Pennsylvania, the Academy of Natural Sciences and the National University of Mongolia head out to the Lake Hövsgöl Long-Term Ecological Research (LTER) site. Camp staff, project coordinators, undergrads, grad students, post-docs and faculty members are the backbone of this team united through the PIRE Mongolia Project (Partnerships in International Research and Education). Through this project, plant ecologists, biogeochemists, soil scientists, climate modelers, and others are empirically documenting the effects of climate and land-use change on this arid ecosystem, which has been grazed for a millennia by the livestock of local nomadic herders. How the microbial ecology of this ecosystem shifts with climate change and how this correlates with shifts in the plant community are some of the central questions under investigation.  

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Posted in WIW Asia By Mo Bio

Yangtze River, China

7/1/2013 10:50 AM

Anthropogenic influences on the global nitrogen cycle have resulted in a series of environmental problems including global acidification, increased emission of the greenhouse gas N2O, and eutrophication in estuaries and coastal seas. Yangtze River is the third-largest river in the world. In recent years, the Yangtze River has a high load of anthropogenic nutrients from increased agricultural activities, fish farming, and wastewater runoff due to the increase in population and economic development, which has resulted in severely eutrophic status in the estuarine and coastal area. Since the 1980’s, harmful algal blooms have occurred frequently in this area, due to excessive inputs of inorganic nitrogen. Hence, the nitrogen transformations are of major concern in the Yangtze Estuary.

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Posted in WIW Asia By Mo Bio

Vellar Estuary, India

7/1/2013 10:48 AM

Approximately 99% of bacteria present in soil are uncultivable making it impossible to study by culture dependent methods. Estuaries and mangroves are important ecosystems in Asia consisting of 42% world mangroves playing crucial role in coastal and ocean nutrient cycling. It is vital to study these habitats in detail through culture independent approaches in order to understand the ecosystem functioning and biotechnological potentials.

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Posted in WIW Asia By Mo Bio

Etosha National Park, Namibia

6/30/2013 6:14 PM

infection become prey for a number of scavengers in the region. Vultures are among the most abundant scavengers here and they may play a role in the distribution of Bacillus anthracis endospores. However, this role has not been quantified, and a misguided belief that vultures transmit disease over long distances has led to an extreme decline in numbers. Dr. Ganz informed us that both of their study species, lappet-faced vultures (Torgos tracheliotos) and white-backed vultures (Gyps africanus), are currently listed as threatened species. Their research, then, not only seeks to better understand population disease transmission, but also seeks to strengthen coonservation efforts. 

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Posted in WIW Africa By Mo Bio

A group of 33 people including Emelia DeForce (shown at right), a graduate student from University of Massachusetts Boston, sailed the tall ship SSV Corwith Cramer to collect and study plastics in the North Atlantic subtropical gyre.  The research and teaching vessel of Sea Education Association in Woods Hole, MA left out of Bermuda and covered over 3800 nautical miles going east passing over the mid Atlantic Ridge on a 34 day journey.  This was a follow-up cruise to sample an area that had not been surveyed for plastics.  To collect the tiny pieces of plastic, mostly millimeters in size, they towed a neuston net several times a day overboard then sieved and counted over 48,000 tiny plastic pieces by hand! Emelia and other microbial ecologists on board also preserved pieces of plastic for further investigation back in the labs at Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution and Marine Biological Laboratories.

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Posted in WIW North America By Mo Bio

OTS, Costa Rica

5/1/2013 11:01 AM

Forest fragmentation has been a prominent threat to the conservation of biodiversity, especially in tropical habitats. Costa Rica, nestled in the Central American isthmus, houses an extensive amount of biodiversity, and so is an area where crucial examination and careful monitoring of land fragmentation and its effects are pertinent. The Organization for Tropical Studies (OTS), in Costa Rica, takes a large part in this very important role. OTS is a nonprofit organization that brings together 63 research institutions in the United States, Latin America and Australia to "provide leadership in education, research and the responsible use of natural resources in the tropics." 

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Posted in WIW Latin America By Mo Bio

The infamous LA river winds through the center of Los Angeles, heavily polluted with waste from the city. It may not quality as a southern California scenic destination, but as far as bioremediation projects go, this locale is ideal! The river provides a fertile source of microorganisms accustomed to living with and degrading pollutants. Nikki Thadani and a team of fellow California Institute of Technology (Caltech) undergraduates have chosen this urban river as their site of choice for the iGEM synthetic biology competition. They hope to produce a bioremediation system for endocrine disruptors. Endocrine disruptors such as DDT and BPA have a significant detrimental impact on the reproductive systems of organisms living

Read More
Posted in WIW North America By Mo Bio